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3 Answers

Paying for aircraft rental

Asked by: 1501 views FAA Regulations, Private Pilot

I am facing a bit of a debacle. I am planning to fly this Saturday and am wanting to take my friend along for a ride as a birthday present for her. 

I don't plan on flying to another airport just for fun then back to the airport. After I get back though is where I'm facing the cliff. If I pay for it all myself out of my own pocket would I be within my rights as private pilot or would I be breaking the FAA regulations. To add on to the hairyness of the concern is that I work for the FBO that I plan to rent from.

If anyone could help clear this up for me asap I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks, 

Lionel

 

3 Answers



  1. Ron Klutts on Jan 02, 2013

    The question is a little vague but I’m guessing your asking if its okay to pay for the entire flight yourself?

    Yes!

    The only thing you can do as a private pilot is pay 100% of the cost, or share equally in the cost amongst however many passengers there are. That’s it.

    Plus the problem of not becoming a charter for friends and dropping them off somewhere and having them pay. Sharing the cost is always meant as a way for you to share in the cost of a flight that YOU were going to do anyway. Anything else can get you into trouble.

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  2. Best Answer


    Mark Kolber on Jan 02, 2013

    You are not going to have a problem with violation of private pilot compensation rules if you pay for the flight all by yourself and receive nothing that smells like “compensation” in return. Not completely official, but “compensation” for these purposes can be roughly defined as “receipt of something of value in exchange for the flight and pilot services.” Doesn’t have to be money.

    “61.113(c) A private pilot may not pay less than the pro rata share of the operating expenses of a flight with passengers, provided the expenses involve only fuel, oil, airport expenditures, or rental fees.”

    Thus maxes out the amount a pilot may =receive= from his passengers to a fraction of certain costs.where the numerator is 1 and the denominator is the number of people on board the flight, including the pilot (assuming they are on a joint venture for a common purpose other than the mode fo transportation.)

    It does not place and upper limit the pilot. just what the passenger is permitted to pay the pilot on a properly shared flight..

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  3. Lionel Wilkinson on Jan 21, 2013

    Thanks for the answers you guys. I appreciate the detail on yours Mark it made it much more clearer for me to understand.

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