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3 Answers

Commercial written

Asked by: 3402 views Commercial Pilot

I have passed the IFR written and am halfway through the IFR training. Since I am in book mode, have the King commercial home study and can get an online endorsement to take the commercial written now, is there any reason I cannot/should not do it? I know the commercial certificate can be limited to VFR if you do not have the IFR rating. But is the commercial written I would pass before getting the IFR applicable to getting an unrestricted commercial certificate if I take the practical after getting the IFR? I know this is not the normal path, but just curious. I like the idea of getting the book work out of the way, and having the knowledge during the actual flight training. Thanks.

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3 Answers



  1. Wesley Beard on Jan 19, 2011

    The written tests don’t matter when you take them.  The only restriction on them is a two year window for the test to be accepted on the practical test.  If you are not planning on obtaining the commercial certificate within two years, I would wait to take the written test.
     
    The regulations state a commercial pilot without instrument rating will have a cross country limitation.  Once the instrument rating is obtained, the limitation will go away.  In the end, if you get the commercial certificate first or the instrument rating first the end result will be the same.
     
    I hope this helps.

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  2. James MacGregor CFI on Jan 23, 2011

      Just get your IFR done first then move on.
     
    Getting all ahead of yourself is asking for problems, there is soo much you need to know for your IFR it is best to keep a single track mindset in getting that done.  Dont worry about your comerrical, its just a overblown private, worry about that after the ink is dry on your IFR!

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  3. Chuck Toussieng on Jan 24, 2011

    Both previous comments above are correct- and I agree with James.
    Get your IFR done first.  If you are in book mode and just can’t get enough of the reading stuff, there is a ton of material to read that will help you with your instrument ticket.  You cannot possibly ingest too much information on instrument flying.
     
    I took my Commercial ride 2 weeks after my instrument ride and I sailed through it.  It was actually fun (and who LOVES checkrides, right!?)
     
    Spend the time on your instrument flying- you won’t regret it.  Remember that a VOR approach down to minimums in actual is much less forgiving than a Lazy 8 🙂
     

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