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4 Answers

Can I give an aircraft checkout on my own a/c that I intend to rent out, without being a CFI?

Asked by: 1545 views
General Aviation

  • If I were to provide an airplane checkout on my own airplane would I have to be a CFI to charge for it?
    • Does this potentially fall under a “for-hire” operation that does not require an air carrier certificate (14 CFR 119.1)
      • “(3) Ferry or training flights;” Excerpt From: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). “2015 FAR/AIM.”
    • Additionally, would an aircraft checkout trigger the 100 hour MX inspection requirement?

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4 Answers

  1. Best Answer


    Kris Kortokrax on Apr 12, 2015

    I don’t have enough info to give a good answer.

    1 Is your insurance company OK with you doing the checkout without having a Flight Instructor certificate?

    2 What kind of aircraft is it? If it is an experimental aircraft, If so, you need to look at 91.319 and your operating limitations. They don’t allow carrying persons or property for compensation or hire. If you were a CFI, there is a LODA available which would allow the instruction.

    3 Training time is defined in 61.3(b) as: “Training time means training received –
    (i) In flight from an authorized instructor”

    4 91.409(b) describes the requirement for a 100 hour inspection.

    Student instruction does not require an air carrier certificate.

    Theoretically, if you were experienced enough, you might be able to teach someone something. The problem is, if the time will be used toward a future certificate or rating, the training would need to be given by an authorized instructor.

    Having done many insurance checkouts, most require some dual instruction (given by a CFI). Some are satisfied with an endorsement stating that the pilot is qualified to act as PIC (again from a CFI).

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  2. Robert Masters on Apr 24, 2015

    Kris,

    Thank you for your thoughtful and thorough response. I didn’t get a notification so I apologize for the delay.

    I am considering a partnership on a Piper Saratoga and placing the airplane with a flying club. Ideally, I would like to provide the checkout flights but my CFI/II are long expired.

    It’s probably going to be most practical to delegate the checkouts to the club’s CFI’s or get mine reinstated. However, it does seem there might be a little wiggle room. I’ll have to get in touch with a FSDO (although it often seems like those guys are just as clueless about the practical application of regs as anyone).

    Thanks again for your answer, it brings up more questions but they’re good ones.

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  3. Kris Kortokrax on Apr 27, 2015

    61.199 is the reg that deals with reinstatement.

    You only need to take one practical test to reinstate all your ratings.

    If you feel more comfortable with the instrument stuff, reinstate with the Instrument practical test. If not reinstate with the CFI Airplane practical test.

    No need to retake any of the knowledge tests.

    The list of required tasks for reinstatement is contained in the appropriate PTS.

    Just brush up on the maneuvers and find a DPE who is authorized to do the reinstatement practical. You don’t need to go to the FSDO for the test.

    You also don’t need a complex airplane to do the reinstatement.

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  4. Mark Kolber on Apr 28, 2015

    It’s probably going to be most practical to delegate the checkouts to the club’s CFI’s or get mine reinstated. However, it does seem there might be a little wiggle room. I’ll have to get in touch with a FSDO (although it often seems like those guys are just as clueless about the practical application of regs as anyone).

    FSDO cluelessness aside, as Kris said, the answer whether you can is likely to be more insurance driven than regulation-driven.

    What many forget is that a “checkout” is not a term or concept you will find anywhere in the FAR. There is no such thing from a regulatory standpoint. It’s purely an owner and insurance-driven concept – is your club and its insurer willing to take the risk associated with a non-CFI approving someone to fly that Saratoga? If your insurer wants X hours of dual, it will almost certainly need to be with a current and qualified CFI.

    From an FAR standpoint, the only real issue is whether, in addition to a “checkout” the member also needs a complex or high performance endorsement. That will require a CFI.

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