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4 Answers

Exercise the priviliges of a SIC in Venezuelan license to FAA license?

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Commercial Pilot, FAA Regulations, General Aviation

 

Hello, im currently seeking for a new job in a N aircradft C550 that its base in Venezuela, I have a FAA comercial license and Venezuelan comercial license.

I have a doubt, i know the FARS say that to get a SIC in a C550 you need to do 3 takeoff and landings and ground school in the unites states. But i have a question that people told me it can be done.

 

I have been looking the FARS and i know the procedures to get the SIC. 3 takeoff and landings in the united states and ground instruction. But some people have told me that if i have a SIC in C550 in my Venezuelan License, i can exercise the privileges of a SIC C550 in a N aircraft if a have a US FAA license.

I received 8 hours here in Venezuela from a Venezuelan CFI, and 20 hours of ground school of the aircraft, and i have and endorsement to act as a SIC in my Venezuelan license. Can i act as a SIC on a N C550 with my FAA license without having the endorsement in the FAA license? or without doing the takeoff and landings in the US?

Can i exercise the priviliges of a SIC in an November aircraft C550 if i have the second in comand in my venezuela license? knowing that i have the FAA comercial license?

4 Answers



  1. Bruce J. Sato CFI, CFII on Jun 01, 2013

    So the aircraft is registered here in the United States but operated in Venezuela?

    61.55 Second-in-command qualifications.

    (a) A person may serve as a second-in-command of an aircraft type certificated for more than one required pilot flight crewmember or in operations requiring a second-in-command pilot flight crewmember only if that person holds:

    (1) At least a current private pilot certificate with the appropriate category and class rating; and

    (2) An instrument rating or privilege that applies to the aircraft being flown if the flight is under IFR; and

    (3) The appropriate pilot type rating for the aircraft unless the flight will be conducted as domestic flight operations within United States airspace.

    (b) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, no person may serve as a second-in-command of an aircraft type certificated for more than one required pilot flight crewmember or in operations requiring a second-in-command unless that person has within the previous 12 calendar months:

    (1) Become familiar with the following information for the specific type aircraft for which second-in-command privileges are requested—

    (i) Operational procedures applicable to the powerplant, equipment, and systems.

    (ii) Performance specifications and limitations.

    (iii) Normal, abnormal, and emergency operating procedures.

    (iv) Flight manual.

    (v) Placards and markings.

    (2) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, performed and logged pilot time in the type of aircraft or in a flight simulator that represents the type of aircraft for which second-in-command privileges are requested, which includes—

    (i) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop as the sole manipulator of the flight controls;

    (ii) Engine-out procedures and maneuvering with an engine out while executing the duties of pilot in command; and

    (iii) Crew resource management training.

    Here is the reference link that might help you out, Good Luck!

    http://www.nbaa.org/admin/personnel/sic/

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  2. Bruce J. Sato CFI, CFII on Jun 01, 2013

    I don’t personally think you can act as SIC, unless you have done the requirements listed in FAA Part 61.55(b) in the US.

    It doesn’t specify where it needs to be done but it is a FAA regulation, and in a FAA registered aircraft (Assuming). So the training also needs to be done in the United States. There are probably other ways to do it but I’m not to sure.

    This is just my .2 cents

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  3. rishi on Mar 21, 2014

    No you cannot. I fly in vz all my sic are done in the usa on my FAA lic

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  4. thomas inglima on Nov 12, 2014

    Within the USA and probably most countries.

    Assuming the pilot is operating an N registered aircraft entirely within the boundaries of their home country. EX: a person holds a Venezuela license with SIC privileges for LR-Jet. A N registered airplane is to be flown entirely within Venezuela airspace.

    Assuming the N registered LR-JET can be shown to be airworthy per US (FAR) regs the SIC can act as SIC on their Venezuela license. Obviously that same is true for any crew member.

    In fact here in the USA I can fly any aircraft I am rated and current in regardless of country of registry as long as I stay within US airspace and I can show the aircraft is airworthy in the country of registry. However once I leave US Airspace, I can only fly N registered aircraft since I only hold US certificates.

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